Isla and I started fostering greyhounds in 2014, since then we have fostered 8 hounds. Some have stayed for months but most have found homes within a few weeks and we have only had one return customer. A testament to the GAP process of matching hounds to homes.

The GAP 2017 Calendar stars have been announced! See below for the hounds that made this years calendar. A very big thanks to all who submitted pictures for the calendar this year. They just get better and better!

A very special thanks again to Falyn Cranston for her expert work on the production of the calendar!

Cover: Asher (unraced)

Mr & Miss January: Frank (unraced) and Zola (Dolly Scramble)

Co-stars: Bella (Rhyme in Melody) | Ben (unraced) and Izzy (Imperative) | Blondie (Fancy Kate)

Miss February: Zola (Dolly Scramble)

Being an Exhibitor in a National Festival is no mean feat.  Lilo practiced a little during the last festival but this year has honed her skills to awe-inspiring perfection. She is naturally exhausted from this considerable effort.

She likes to work when she is "hotted-up€.  Her best effort occurs when she has just come back from a long walk, had her dinner, feels a ripple of excitement - then WHAM OH - she sneaks out into the garden and creates her masterpiece.

It's not funny lying in bed night after night dwelling on why you so called "rescued" a cat from the SPCA, brought him to his "Forever Home" where he was promptly terrorised (in his mind) by the Black Sniper, and finally ran away to a life of garbage bins and sticking out ribs. Nightmare.

It's that time of year again!

We are now taking submissions for the 2017 GAP Calendar! We will also have some photography tips on the website soon.

All photos need to be landscape and at least 300dpi to be at the best quality for printing. Please save each file with the dog's pet and racing names (or 'unraced') in order to make them easy to identify. In photos with more than one dog please identify which dog is which to save any embarrassing mistakes!

Email your entries to calendar@gap.co.nz

Why should I crate train my Greyhound? Crate training your greyhound is a great way to ensure a smooth transition from a kennel environment into a home. A crate gives your greyhound its own space in an unfamiliar house, helps with toileting, cat training, child safety and also protects your home from any mischief a new greyhound could get up to.  It is suitable for almost all types of greyhound as it provides comfort and security for the more nervous and shy dogs, and safety and protection for the more outgoing and mischievous types.

We were all surviving and had made it to the end of the third week. Despite the setback of The Great Chase Down the Hall, relationships all round seemed pretty good. Benjamin had got over the set back after a day or two and Lilo seemed to adopt a supercilious air as if she had made her "I-Can-Outrun-You-Any-Day-Mate€ point. Harmony reigned.

Ah! There we go again, the old "smug€ feeling.

June 19 was a very special day on the greyhound calendar as the hundreds of greyhounds and dozens of other canine 'supporters' took to streets, trails and parks all over New Zealand as part of the Great Global Greyhound Walk (GGGW). This is an annual event of mass, synchronised greyhound walks around the world to raise awareness of the breed and help promote greyhound adoptions. The New Zealand walks were part of an overall global coordinated effort, and if fact, because of our time zone, kicked the whole thing off.

As a homeopath based in Napier I see people with chronic and acute illness every day. It never ceases to amaze me how this form of natural, safe, effective medicine has the ability to trigger the body's innate ability to heal itself and often within minutes, hours or days. The medicines are mainly made from plant, mineral and animal material and instead of treating the disease, we try to find the substance which matches the whole person and the presenting complaints. That means various factors must be considered: What is the causation? What makes the symptoms better or worse?

Establish a relationship with the best Vet you can find. Depending on the overall condition of your dog it may be advisable to have it checked every six months.  Your Vet should be someone whom you trust and with whom you feel very comfortable.

Educate yourself about the conditions common to older pets and the therapies used for them. Be alert to symptoms so that you can bring them to your Vet's attention promptly.

Feed your older dog the best food you can afford. Consider feeding two small meals daily rather than one large one.

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Upcoming Events

GAP Walk - Petone

18 August 2019 - 9:30am

GAP Walk - Manawatu

25 August 2019 - 1:30pm

GAP at the Riccarton Market

1 September 2019 - 9:00am

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